Author Topic: Depth Gauge Rounding and Drive Link Deburring Wheels  (Read 584 times)

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Online Philbert

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Some Other Notes

- As noted, the faster wheel speed worked better.  Some of these wheels are rated up to 18,000 RPM, which is 5X the maximum speed I tried.  A die grinder mounted to a bench might be an interesting way to try these higher speeds.

- I would also want to test the coarser wheels at the higher speeds to see if I could get fast material removal with less deep scratching.

- One, 2-inch diameter wheel was tried.  It worked, but was not as convenient, or as fast, as the 3-inch wheels.

- I also tried one, 6-inch diameter by 1/2-inch wide, soft, fine wheel on the slower motor.  The faster edge speed helped, but did not make up for the slow cutting speed.  The wheel was still too thick, and the larger diameter restricted positioning of the cutters more than the 3-inch wheels.

- Thicker wheels might work with chains that do not have the reduced-kickback bumpers, due to more clearance between chain components.  I wanted something that would work with all chains.

- 1/8-inch wide wheels would also work, but the price difference is minimal, compared to the 1/4-inch wheels, which have twice as much abrasive material.

- It is still possible to nick your newly sharpened cutting edges if you are not careful, but you can also do this with a file, Dremel, etc.

- All of these test subjects were reduced-kickback style chains.  Regardless of whether they had bumper drive links or bumper tie straps, the bumpers were harder to round, and took more time to round, than the depth gauges(!).  It took 1 to 1.5 seconds to round each depth gauge.  Bumpers took about 3 seconds each.

- Shaping the rounded profile of the depth gauges was easiest to control with the flat depth gauges held perpendicular to the wheel edge.  Holding the depth gauges parallel with the wheels produced a smoother finish, even with the coarser wheels, but increased the risk of contact with the sharpened cutting edges.

- As the wheel wore and formed a concave edge, I periodically flipped the chain (polished from the other side) to keep wheel wear even.

- Remember that these wheels remove metal fast! Spend too much time focusing on the smooth curve and you might remove several thousandths more than you intended, ending up with a more aggressive chain!

Philbert

Offline HolmenTree

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Rounding off the leading edge of the depth gauge I use the same flat file that I lower them with. Then after a few hours of cutting in wood they get perfectly honed smooth with the perfect angle of approach matched to its cutter bit size.
How well a chain cuts is dependent not only at the cutting edge but also at the surface of the depth gauge.
As I explained how the leading edge of the depth gauge in the wood kerf gets worn smooth after  a few hours of steady cutting . The surface of that leading edge is perfectly matched to the angle of the cutter with the least amount of friction due to its  best method of honing.
Your good to go for quite a few more touch ups of the cutter with the round file before the DG has to be lowered again.
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Online Philbert

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- As noted, the faster wheel speed worked better.  Some of these wheels are rated up to 18,000 RPM, which is 5X the maximum speed I tried.  A die grinder mounted to a bench might be an interesting way to try these higher speeds.

- I would also want to test the coarser wheels at the higher speeds to see if I could get fast material removal with less deep scratching.

3M guy confirmed that wheel performance would improve with the faster speed, and that they would act like a finer grit at those 18,000 RM speeds.  Said that they would also last longer at higher speeds.

Philbert

P.S. - my neighbor suggested that I try a Harbor Freight die grinder 'for about $20'.  Got me excited.  But they are more like $50.  And I need variable speed to limit it to 18,000 RPM. . . . will keep an eye out at garage sales.

Offline HolmenTree

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The day I use a grinder on my depth gauges is the day I'll  pack 'er in ;D :-*
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Online Philbert

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The day I use a grinder on my depth gauges is the day I'll  pack 'er in
I've seen a lot of guys post on A.S. that only file their cutters, but are happy to grind their depth gauges.  Took me a while to grind them without burning, especially on low-kickback chain with the extra bumpers.  Now it goes fast.

Philbert

Offline Al Smith

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I just use a flat file when I file the rakers which might be two or three times in the entire life of the chain.

Some people make love to a work chain like it's rocket science which it isn't .A race chain however is one to take the time with IMO .

The way I look at a work chain is if it's throwing  big old chips I just leave it alone .I could care less if every tooth is the same length and all the stuff the so called experts say .

Online jmester

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Al, could not agree more.
FEAR NO TREE. FEAR GOD.

Offline Cut4fun .

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Fixed?
REDNECK Saw Repair Getter Done

Offline 3000 FPS

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I don't have to cut wood for a living and it is really a hobby for me.   Since part of the enjoyment is finding out all the technical aspects of the hobby, I like fussing over a chain and learning all I can to make it cut straight and fast.   Heck if did not like it why spend a good chunk of change on a square grinder.   Not only I did I enjoy learning how to use it but I really liked the results too.  So we all come at this with alittle different perspective.
PP 505, 475, 445.

Online Philbert

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Fixed?
Thanks!

(I asked to change the thread name slightly to reflect the wheels I was using, as opposed to other tools or methods).

. . . I like fussing over a chain and learning all I can to make it cut straight and fast.

I think that the chain is the most important part of a chainsaw.  That said, everyone needs to find what works for them, how much effort they want to put into it, etc.


Philbert

 

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