Author Topic: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height  (Read 376 times)

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Offline Philbert

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Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« on: February 17, 2014, 10:17:59 pm »
A member asked me to post this here.

Guys new to sharpening chains often have trouble with file position, and miss the key cutting edges on the top plate and side plate, focusing too much on the shape of the gullet.  Many file guides will  hold the file at the correct depth.  Others allow more flexibility

Some guys will intentionally file/grind their chains differently - one of the benefits of sharpening your own chains is that you get to do it how you want!

These illustrations are based on manufacturer's recommendations and are a good starting point.

Philbert

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Offline Cut4fun .

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2014, 01:25:08 pm »
This should help the guys trying to learn to hand file or use a grinder IMO.  Thanks for the pics etc.
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Offline Philbert

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2014, 01:42:18 pm »
Here's another comment I often share with guys new to sharpening: There are lots of ways to sharpen - pick one that works for you

It is sometimes easiest if someone shows/helps you in person, and you follow the same method and use the same tools.  Some make more sense intuitively to a person, or meet specific needs (cost, number of chains sharpened, availability of power, etc.).  It helps if you understand the basics of what you are trying to do with the cutter and how the different methods help you (or not!).

There are lots of filing guides/devices out there. Some are are tied to a specific brand or size of chain. Not a big deal if you only run one or two type/size/brands of chain. But it can be frustrating if you have different saws, run different pitches, and end up with lots of different guides that you have to keep straight.

- Plain files work with any chain of a specific pitch, provided you have the right diameter file.  But they provide the least help shaping the cutter edges.
 
- Grinders, Granberg type filing guides, and Dremel type sharpeners work with with any pitch, provided you have the right wheel or file or stone.  The first two mentioned are the most structured and will provide the most consistent cutters.

- Flat file guides work with most chains of a specific pitch (but won't do a 10* 'down angle' if that is important to you).  They are simple and inexpensive.

- Roller guides get increasingly type/brand specific (e.g. narrow kerf is different, low profile is different, some need to be modified to fit other brands, etc.).  They are popular if they work with your chains.

- File-O-Plates are the most chain/brand specific.  Simple and inexpensive, but you may need several of them to cover different chain sizes, brands, types.  Not available for all chains.

Some of the sharpeners or guides only work at specific angles (e.g. 30* top plate), which is OK if that is what you want, but does not provide you with any flexibility to change or customize angles.

Philbert

Offline 660magnum

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2014, 04:17:06 pm »
I wanted to refine myself so years ago so in the spring of 1977, I bought this book about chainsaws and attempted to follow the instructions on sharpening chains using the Oregon flat file guides.

It worked and I followed that for the next 25 years until I began refining myself farther with clamp-on guides and eventually grinders

http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/chainsaw-guide-zmaz78ndzraw.aspx
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Offline Philbert

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2014, 04:48:31 pm »
Great link!  Thanks.

I actually got a small, folding sawbuck I designed published in Mother Earth News.

Philbert

http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/homemade-sawbuck-zm0z12onzhun.aspx

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Offline 660magnum

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2014, 05:02:46 pm »
+1
We should share what we know... someone may learn...
That knowledge can live after us... and that "Pays It Forward".
Be all that you can be . . .

Offline Philbert

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2014, 05:37:16 pm »
Read the MEN article and ordered a full copy off of Amazon just to check it out.  Hard choice: 1 cent for a used copy in good condition or should I spring for that new copy?

Philbert

Offline 660magnum

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2014, 06:05:42 pm »
Well, it was written in the 70's so some aspects will be dated but others are timeless.
We should share what we know... someone may learn...
That knowledge can live after us... and that "Pays It Forward".
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Offline Philbert

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2014, 03:02:56 pm »
Got my copy and have read through most of it: Barnacle Parp's Chainsaw Guide: Buying, Using and Maintaining Gas and Electric Chain Saws.

Pretty comprehensive for it's time.  But, as you note, much of it is outdated as saws, sources, and knowledge have changed in the last 36 years.  He is very opinionated, and has quite the pro-STIHL bias.  But still an interesting read, especially considering how little I knew about chainsaws in 1978!

The information on older saws could still be helpful, as well as other approaches for doing things.  Also interesting to see some of the same discussions/disagreements we are still having today.  Pretty cheap as a used book, and apparently, some PDF versions may be available.

Thanks for pointing it out.

Philbert

Offline 660magnum

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Re: Cutter Filing / Grinding Height
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2014, 03:15:01 pm »
I didn't have any of the foreign saws he mentioned nor had I ever seen one at the time. I had to go on my on experiences with Lombard's, Homelites, & Mac's plus this book. It didn't steer me wrong for the time in the mid 70's. It was probably the best thing I could have done as far as chainsaw knowledge in the 70's. I worked 7 days/week and had two kids and two acres. Not much free time.
We should share what we know... someone may learn...
That knowledge can live after us... and that "Pays It Forward".
Be all that you can be . . .

 

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