Author Topic: Square Grinders  (Read 9324 times)

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Offline 660magnum

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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #60 on: February 14, 2013, 10:42:02 am »
+1  That was my point
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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #61 on: February 14, 2013, 11:36:28 pm »
I got an email back from Simington this evening.   It seems that they have been out of town on a ag expo.   Said he would get a hold of me next week on the grinder.     I guess that is what you call a small buisness.    Well anyways I am glad he got in touch and maybe I will get a grinder ordered next week.   
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Offline 660magnum

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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #62 on: February 15, 2013, 06:08:19 am »
Lay'd back eh? It is more or less a ranch with a welding/fabrication shop.

It's very rural and beautiful if you like the remote high altitude (5,000') life.

From Salt Creek Industries, it's some 15 mi East to Lakeview (pop 2,300) which has what you usually need and a all day trip West to Klamath Falls (pop 21,000) for the big city life and a Walmart.

Medford and Bend are over that way a little farther to the West.
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Offline mdavlee .

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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #63 on: February 15, 2013, 09:03:47 am »
Those guys are busy with the other business and the grinders do seem to take a back seat sometimes. If you use the ceramic you can do a whole 60dl chain without a second pass and it will still be crisp. It's the only wheel that will let you do that. The waxed gray works for removing a lot of material at a time but has to be dressed twice a side for a 60 dl.
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Online srcarr52

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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #64 on: February 15, 2013, 10:04:24 am »
Those guys are busy with the other business and the grinders do seem to take a back seat sometimes. If you use the ceramic you can do a whole 60dl chain without a second pass and it will still be crisp. It's the only wheel that will let you do that. The waxed gray works for removing a lot of material at a time but has to be dressed twice a side for a 60 dl.

I use a salmon wheel and I find that they load up.  I can do an entire side of a 32" full comp chain without dressing the stone and the cutters will look great.  Then switch to the other side, reverse the direction of the motor and it will burn the cutter.  So I always dress between sides.  If I'm doing smaller chains like 20" I'll do 2 at a time.
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Offline 660magnum

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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #65 on: February 18, 2013, 04:01:44 am »
SILVEY SDM-4 SQUARE GRINDER

I came across these pictures of a Silvey SDM-4 grinder. It is a variation of the Silvey Prosharp even though it has two chain vises like a RZ II. Relationship is more towards the Prosharp because of the way it presents the chain cutter to the grinding wheel so that the whole working surface of the grinding wheel does an equal amount of grinding. The way the vise holds the chain is more like the Prosharp and not at all like either of the Razur Sharp designs.

http://silveychaingrinder.com/chisel-square-grinders/sdm-4-grinder

http://www.madsens1.com/sil_sdm4.htm

http://www.madsens1.com/GRAPHICS/Silvey/sdm4.wmv
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Offline mdavlee .

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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #66 on: February 18, 2013, 09:31:58 am »
I really regret not getting a SDM 4 a few years ago when madsens was having a big sale on them at $1k.:(
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Offline 660magnum

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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #67 on: February 18, 2013, 10:17:58 am »
There's a new one on Ebay (the one in the pictures) but he wants $1600 for it.

It has two chain vises like your RZ II but other than the motor and grinding wheel being the same, that is about the end of the similarity.

I don't think they have made the Prosharp in a few years??? so the SDM-4 is the Cadillac for now.
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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #68 on: February 25, 2013, 09:58:45 pm »
Alright 660Magnum.   I got my grinder in today and got it all set up.   I checked the level of the grinder from side to side and all is good.   I put a chain on and got right in the corner no problem.    Now for a few questions.
1.   I know I cannot keep it completely out of the tie strap but how much is acceptable and what can I do to minimize that.
2.  What angles do you like to put on the grinding wheel and what kind of measuring device do you use.

Oh and one more thing,  I really like it and it is pretty easy to use.   Thanks for the recomendation.
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Offline 660magnum

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Re: Square Grinders
« Reply #69 on: February 25, 2013, 11:26:54 pm »
You have to lower the arm to get out of the tie strap. It doesn't take much. But in your learning of the inter-relationships, you will notice, to lower the arm
requires you to back up the stop and raise the cutter tooth on the holder. This will change your inner top angle a degree or so. But it will get the wheel
out of the tie strap too.



The 451 presents a problem for the beginner with all its adjustments. You have probably lowered or raised the arm with the little black knob under the arm to
get the corner of the wheel in the corner of the cutter? But this has gotten you into the tie strap? The 450 could not raise and lower the arm and you had to
use the cutter stop to make the corners align. You normally didn't get into the tie strap unless you were grinding .404. So be aware of your interrelationships.



I consider any streak on the tie strap to weaken it? This makes a minor difference on a 346 but if you are using the chain on a 084, it could make the chain break.




As far as standard acceptable angles go, I use the little angle chart offered by Madsens. I checked some Oregon CL against the chart and it was pretty much right on.

For a angle finder, I had a couple Brown & Sharp and Starret angle finders of different types but decided I liked a little $4 yellow plastic one from Lowes or Home Depot better.

A Thought Exercise About Interrelationships
The outside vertical side plate angle is often ignored or miss understood. You want about 2 degrees positive inclination. That means that the part of the
outside vertical angle closest to the top plate is to be 2 degrees ahead of the part of the angle nearest the gullet. The angle reference is with the line of travel
and not with reference to the top plane of the top plate which is sloped to allow clearance for the aft part of the cutter. This angle should be either 88 or 92
degrees depending on how you read the protractor from the bar rail. The reason for this 2 degrees is that the front of the cutter raises up ever so slightly
when in the wood. The 2 degrees is an attempt to keep the cutter outside angle zero-zero with the wood while in the cut. If you get too much lead, beyond 5
degrees, on the vertical angle, you will feel it in the chainsaw. This angle is changed by the vertical angle on the edge of the wheel. Be careful here as the
adjustment on the dresser is reversed compared with the result on the cutter tooth.
We should share what we know... someone may learn...
That knowledge can live after us... and that "Pays It Forward".
Be all that you can be . . .

 

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