Author Topic: Oregon CS300 - Second Generation 40Volt Chainsaw  (Read 265 times)

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Online Philbert

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Oregon CS300 - Second Generation 40Volt Chainsaw
« on: September 29, 2015, 12:03:19 am »
I have had an Oregon CS250, 40Volt, battery-powered chainsaw for about 4 years now, and have posted some comments on it in related threads.  They recently released their 'second generation' version, the CS300, and I have had a little time to check it out and compare it to the earlier one.

Oregon claims:
- 40% more power and 50% torque than the CS250;
- 19% increase in chain speed, from 2350 to 2796 feet per minute;
- longer, 16-inch bar, than the 14-inch bar on the CS250;
- brushless (more efficient) motor;
- tool-less chain tensioner.

Physically, the dimensions of the saws appear identical, except for the slightly longer bar, and they both use the same batteries. Weight of the newer saw is about 12 ounces heavier, due to the longer bar and the tool-less chain tensioner gear. Pricing on the new saw appears to be similar to the one it is replacing.

Links to the product web page and data sheet:
http://oregoncordless.com/product/chain-saw-cs300/
http://oregoncordless.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/A110009aa_CordlessFB_CS300_LASER_010520151.pdf

Philbert

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Online Philbert

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Re: Oregon CS300 - Second Generation 40Volt Chainsaw
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2015, 12:16:12 am »
Comparing the two saws side-by-side (photos above), the noticeable differences (aside from the color scheme) include the addition of a small, metal, bucking dog to the front of the plastic case, and the tool-less chain tensioner knob (which most people thought that the earlier version had: that knob secures clutch cover and bar - still need a screwdriver to tension chain).  I am not a big fan of tool-less chain tensioners, but the large mounting knob, and outside tensioning ring are pretty easy to operate: a small turn of the ring makes a big difference in the chain tension.

The brushless motor on the CS300 has a soft start - almost feels like a delay at first.  Also has a 'softer' sound.  Once started, the difference in power in the cut is immediately noticeable.  I found that the newer model cut approximately 25 to 33% off of the time to make cookies in 3 to 6 inch diameter wood, and up to 50% off in larger (8 inch diameter) wood!  I was surprised at the magnitude of this difference, and will do some more comparisons to make sure that these were not a fluke.

Both saws come with a conventional, manually operated chain brake, but do not have an electric 'instant stop' chain brake. The newer model does have an interesting feature: it emits a tone if you pull the trigger with the chain brake engaged.  I assume that this will reduce the number of nuisance service calls, and admit that I have checked the battery charge level on more than one occasion, only to find the saw not working because the chain brake was 'on'.

Both saws come equipped with the PowerSharp chain and have a built-in chain sharpener, operated by the red levers in the photos above. They can also use conventional 3/8 low profile chain, if preferred, or if a replacement PowerSharp chain is not readily available.

Philbert

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Re: Oregon CS300 - Second Generation 40Volt Chainsaw
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2015, 01:28:24 pm »
Thanks for keeping me and this site updated on this.  Let me know when you run the new one to compare.

The old one Oregon sent me to test out.

Cutting a brick to fubar chain then try to keep cutting. Couldnt do it that fast to continue with regular chain.

https://youtu.be/zaffJf5A0-M
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Online Philbert

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Re: Oregon CS300 - Second Generation 40Volt Chainsaw
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2015, 01:56:23 pm »
Some of those PowerSharp demos and videos backfired on Oregon, in my perspective.  All people remembered was cutting the brick, or cinder block, and associated the battery saw and PowerSharp chain with that type of use (abuse) - something that would really damage normal chain, requiring half the cutter to be ground or filed back.  It really damages PowerSharp chain too (!), and requires lots of the cutter to be ground away to bring it back: it is just easier and faster with the powered sharpening system. After dong these demos repeatedly, people complain that the chain does not last!!!

If you take care of the PowerSharp chain, like you would normal chain you will get good cutting and service life out of them.  When I take one to a GTG, people want to grind the chain away doing demos!  I have actually started to disable the sharpening system on PowerSharp saws I bring to GTGs, so that I don't have to continually replace chains!

As far as battery saws in general, they have their pros and cons (we have discussed this in other threads) - this one seems to have significant improvements from the earlier version, while maintaining the same size, weight, cost, battery compatibility, etc.  If you are not a fan of the PowerSharp chain, you can run it with standard 3/8 low profile/Picco chain, and I assume that you will still see the same improvements over the earlier version.

Philbert

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Re: Oregon CS300 - Second Generation 40Volt Chainsaw
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2015, 01:29:47 pm »
Tried the saw last weekend in some heavier wood. This was a senior clean-up assistance type task in a residential neighborhood, with a few trees like the one shown, down in the yard.

Obviously, no problem with the smaller limbs and branches.  The main log was fairly wet - and a bit larger than I would normally use it for, but wanted to 'push it' a little. I am guessing that it ranged from about 8 inches in diameter, up to about 10+ inches, before I switched to a corded electric saw. The plastic wedge in the photo shows about how far I got on one, 2.6Ah battery charge (middle size battery for the Oregon line).  Trick is to let the saw do the work and not push it.

I could have done the entire log with the 40V saw, if I was patient, and if that was the only saw I had.  But like golf, it's good to have a few clubs to choose from!

Philbert

 

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