Author Topic: WARNING - THIS STUFF IS STILL LIVE UNLESS THE BATTERY IS REMOVED!  (Read 354 times)

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Online Philbert

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***I am posting this here due to the general interest in battery powered outdoor powered equipment (OPE). Many times, when I see someone pick up a battery chainsaw (etc.) their first impulse is to squeeze/test the trigger - not a problem with most gasoline powered tools, where it is easy to know if the engine is running. But it can be a real surprise with an electric tool, especially one without a cord which may be perceived as 'safe', less powerful, or even as a 'toy'. I explain this to anyone when handing them a battery tool; "The tool is 'live' if the battery is installed". I have also placed warning labels and even 'trigger locks' on some tools left out at GTGs.***

The report, below, appears to address manufacturing or design defects, with similar hazards.

"After failing to report safety defects on its battery-powered mowers, Black & Decker is playing a $1.575 million fine after agreeing to a settlement with the Consumer Product Safety Commission and U.S. Justice Dept. The settlement marks the sixth time since 1986 that Black & Decker has paid fines for failing to report safety defects.

This most recent fine regarding battery-powered mower defects covers 11 years, beginning in 1998 when the company began receiving complaints the blades wouldn’t turn off even after the handles were released and safety key removed—and in some cases the blades would start spontaneously. At least two consumers were injured when blades started up while their mowers were being cleaned. According to reports, Black & Decker identified the defect in 2004, but waited until 2009 to report it to the CPSC. The company agreed to a recall of the machines in 2010.

In addition to the fine, Black & Decker must maintain an internal compliance program to ensure compliance with CPSC safety statutes and regulations and also will develop a system of internal controls and procedures including creating written standards and policies, allowing confidential employee reporting of compliance, and implementing corrective and preventive actions when compliance deficiencies or violations are identified."

***Pull the batteries before working on battery powered tools!***

Philbert

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Offline Cut4fun .

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Never thought about this before Thanks for posting.

Would have thought there would have been some kind of safety feature.  To stop accidental trigger pull on contact and chain movement. 

Going to make a sticky for top of board.
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Offline aclarke

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Scary, especially with small kids wanting to emulate dad!

Online Philbert

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Would have thought there would have been some kind of safety feature.  To stop accidental trigger pull on contact and chain movement.
Each of the Oregon battery-powered tools I have, has a dual-activation trigger: some type of 'safety' latch, button, etc. has to be pushed, slid, depressed, etc., before the primary trigger can be squeezed.  In addition, the chain brake on the chainsaw locks out power.  But on some products, it is fairly easy to bump the 'safety' when carrying or transporting the tool. And frankly, the easiest place to carry these heavy, expensive batteries is mounted in the tool.

So on a few tools, I drilled a hole for a positive lock, as shown above. And I am training myself to consciously remove the battery before working on the chain, etc., and not trusting the switch.

The scary part about the B&D recall, is that the mower blade apparently activated with the switch released and the safety key removed.  I have had a couple of woodworking tools (table saw and router) fail with the switch in the 'ON' position due to fine dust build up inside the switch ('Hmmmmm, . . . that blade seems to be coasting for a really long time . . . '), so it can happen with many tools and products. It seems that these battery powered tools might be a special situation, because they appear to be 'safer' than some of their corded or gas counterparts.

Philbert

Online Philbert

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Lithium Battery Fail

Spare lithium battery for an e-cigarette carried loose in pants pocket, along with keys and spare change.  Pretty dramatic!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1LjSuq0rk8

Philbert

 

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