Author Topic: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE  (Read 548 times)

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Offline Al Smith

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2014, 06:17:44 pm »
FWIW Scotch-brite and kerosine is probabley the safest method to clean up a cylinder .It's just takes a little more elbow grease .

Offline SawTroll

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2014, 07:20:17 pm »
Well you probably should get used to removing the muffler before disassembling the saw to see what cylinder/piston damage there is. Then do a pressure/vacuum test. You can use some sort of soap and water mix to spray onto the seals, around the crankcase and everywhere else the case could leak, including the cylinder base and decomp valve as well as the input tract. When you put pressure into the saw the soapy water will bubble up around the leaking air.


Yes, but it is a pity that he likely pulled the top end off before he did that.

Anyway it could also be about leaking fuel hoses, or a non-functional impulse - could also be a faulty carb.

Of course the most likely reasons are bad or streight gas, or too lean carb settings - but if he doesn't know for sure that it was, all the options need to be investigated.

Offline 660magnum

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2014, 08:21:14 pm »
All these must be investigated before the declaration of being finished
We should share what we know... someone may learn...
That knowledge can live after us... and that "Pays It Forward".
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Offline Gregg MacPherson

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2014, 08:49:39 pm »
You guys are hard core. 

Initially,  after spending a miserable winter without my own saw (read as having to use someone else's Craftsman and cut wood for someone elses fire so I could cut wood for myself) I wanted to fix my Husky 154.  As a reaction,  I recently bought a Stihl 021 (yes a weekend saw for girls) as an emergency backup,  but good for some light,  high pruning around home.  But the romanticism of fixing the old Husky 154 was strong.  It was surprisingly easy to fix,  even if I did have to remove the oil pump 5 times.  It's now good to go (fingers crossed),  though I still can't sign off properly on the fuel system.  The 254 may just be for parts,  but may be a fun exercise to fix.  Parts from the States are cheap.

So if there are forensic ways of finding out what happened to the 254 and what the dammage may really be,  I am interested.  But if it gets too scary,  this saw will become parts for the 154.


Offline 660magnum

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2014, 08:59:54 pm »
There's nothing wrong with a 021 as far as that size chainsaw goes. I have a 025 and a MS 250
We should share what we know... someone may learn...
That knowledge can live after us... and that "Pays It Forward".
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Offline KilliansRedLeo

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2014, 09:25:14 pm »
Get after it Gregg! Nothing better than making a saw that doesn't work, run again! You will be amazed at the satisfaction you get from it. When it runs again, it will become your favorite saw, no chit you will love it! It will give you the know-how, confidence and inspiration to do it again and again!

The members here are not 'hard core' we are here to help!

Don't turn a great old saw into parts!
"When the people fear the government...you have tyranny....When the government fears the people....you have liberty"

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Offline Gregg MacPherson

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2014, 10:14:07 pm »
.....The members here are not 'hard core' we are here to help!.....

Hard core just meaning seriously into it...

Offline KilliansRedLeo

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2014, 10:40:05 pm »
No problem, Gregg! Lets' get the saw running again! What ever help you need, we will be there!
"When the people fear the government...you have tyranny....When the government fears the people....you have liberty"

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Offline SawTroll

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2014, 11:00:15 pm »
Just a few things to look at, even though you removed the cylinder;

You could try to turn the H and L screws of the carb in until they seat lightly, and carefully notice how much you can turn them. That will at least tell us how the carb settings were when you recieved the saw.

The fuel lines needs to be bent sharply, to see if there are cracks in them - and it likely is best to replace them anyway.

Also look closely for cracks in the intake between the carb and the cylinder.

Were the cylinder bolts tight or loose when you removed the cylinder? If rather loose, air may have leaked at the cylinder base.

Offline Gregg MacPherson

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Re: Cylinder scoring, sanding, 254SE
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2014, 04:45:45 am »
I was going to mention that I had checked the carb H,L settings.  They were about right at the standard presets from the manual when you tune the carb from scratch.  But I don't have reason to assume that they haven't been otherwise.  I supose if the high was screwed too tight it might have looked a likely cause,  running lean and hot.

The cylinder bolts felt very tight to me.  I had a torque wrench there but I didn't measure that.

I can check the fuel lines.   Can one apply a little air pressure and listen?  Didn't get my stethescope kit yet to make a pressure test kit.

Joining a firewood posse next weekend so the 154 will get a serious workout.  I'll see how that goes.

Thanks for the help you chaps.  (in the colonies chaps are people not a pair of leggings)

 

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