Chainsaw Repair

Chain - Grinders - Filing - Wood Milling - Tools - Welding - Machinist - Mowers - Tillers => Chain - Bars - Grinders - Filing => Topic started by: super44 on April 20, 2013, 12:37:42 pm

Title: Ripping chain cut narrow when cutting across the log?
Post by: super44 on April 20, 2013, 12:37:42 pm
Would it be normal for ripping chain to cut narrow when cutting across a log?  The chain I used to cut lumber with got used a couple times to cut fire wood and seems to cut narrow and stick the blade.
Title: Re: Ripping chain cut narrow when cutting across the log?
Post by: Al Smith on April 20, 2013, 08:30:08 pm
If it's a real rip chain it will not cross cut worth a hoot . Probabley if you refile it it will  be okay .
Title: Re: Ripping chain cut narrow when cutting across the log?
Post by: super44 on April 21, 2013, 07:45:55 pm
It is real rip chain.  It cuts slabs just fine but I was playing with the saw to see how it cut for plain old fire wood.  It's on a Pro Mac 60 with a 28 inch blade and it's kind of a fun saw to play with.  For sure not over powered but it does pretty good.
Title: Re: Ripping chain cut narrow when cutting across the log?
Post by: Al Smith on April 21, 2013, 08:30:31 pm
 Rip chain is designed to pull sawdust as opposed to regular cross cut chain which pulls chips .The dust is what's binding the chain .
Title: Re: Ripping chain cut narrow when cutting across the log?
Post by: HolmenTree on April 22, 2013, 12:22:51 am
Would it be normal for ripping chain to cut narrow when cutting across a log?  The chain I used to cut lumber with got used a couple times to cut fire wood and seems to cut narrow and stick the blade.
Yes most definately it will cut narrower because of the ripping chain's 0 - 10 degree top plate angle. The opposing cutters attached to the sawchain's chassis have some play in the rivet hub / drive link area, so a sharper 30-35 degree top plate angle will allow the cutters pull outwards and cut a wider kerf.

An old trick I do when my chisel cutters are filed down to the witness marks and the chain doesn't cut so good especially if the bar rails are spread more then normal which causes the chain to cut on and off in the wood. What I do is file a much bigger angle like 45 degrees then the witness mark's standard 30 degree , gives me some extra filing life and the chain cuts good again.
When the cutters are filed back this small safety with the more aggressive angle is not an issue, only edge holding capability is lost a little.