Chainsaw Repair

Husqvarna - Stihl - Poulan - Jonsered - Dolmar chainsaws and more => Poulan => Topic started by: Cut4fun . on May 12, 2011, 02:24:17 pm


Title: Poulan 1800
Post by: Cut4fun . on May 12, 2011, 02:24:17 pm
Got a guy that wants a small CHEAP and  LIGHT trim saw to go with his 034/036 he uses to buck with. Showed him the like new 35cc rear handle strato poulan.  He thought the same as me, it's to heavy for cc size, mise well run a 3ci if you were going to handle that saw.

Well I took 4 top handle saws I had on the shelf in red, grey and green and ended up with 1 good one in 1800 covers.  I was hoping to end up with a 33cc motor out of a poulan 2000, but none were any good. So the 30cc it is.

Been testing it for 3 days now and it is passing with flying colors.

The guy came over and it passed his light weight feel and cost.  8) 

Now to fine tune the ease of a cold start and I will feel good about handing it over. About 4 pulls on choke to get pop and about 4 more to stay running at idle. To many pulls IMO.  Down to hitting the L and idle to get it just right.  ;)
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: Cut4fun . on May 12, 2011, 03:10:30 pm
(http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/034036/poulan1800project003.jpg)
(http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/034036/poulan1800project001.jpg)
(http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/034036/poulan1800project002.jpg)
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: super44 on August 23, 2011, 08:08:12 pm
I put new gas line on my Craftsmen 2.0/14 today.  Got it at a retirement trailor park garage sale several years ago.  It looks near identical to this 1800 poulon except it has an assist handle for tightening the chain and it's red.
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: North West Farmer on November 24, 2011, 10:51:32 pm
Chainsawrepair,

My experience has been that the top handle light weights are much better for a trim or pruning saw than a rear handle model.  The balance is much better when you need to reach out and make those one handed cuts, that I know you aren't really supposed to make, but I find myself doing one handers a lot when pruning fruit trees.  If the saw has good balance, I believe you can find methodology that provides safety while performing a single handed cut.  I wouldn't recommend the one hand method to a first time user, I would consider it to be strictly for experienced chainsaw operators.  OSHA would probably cringe at my last remarks, but I am surrounded by orchards and I know for sure that many people in the field do make a lot of one hand controlled cuts, where they don't have a pole saw handy or may not own a pole saw.  My two cents worth.

Your customer's comments about looking for a light weight trim saw would seem to favor the selection of a top handle model, if for no other reason than balance and control in that application.

I do a lot more using of chainsaws than I do working on them, but I do like to know what it takes to keep them running at their best.
The old Poulan XXV Deluxe and it's cousin model from Craftsman are only 30cc or 33cc units, depending on where you look.  I have done a tremendous amount of wood cutting with those saws suporting a 14" bar and they did very well if maintained and tuned. Both are top handle models.

Nick, North West Farmer
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: Cut4fun . on September 09, 2012, 09:20:01 pm
After using the little top handle saw for a year and a half he decided it wasnt the right saw for the work he was doing with it. Soooooo I got the little 1800 back in trade today  ;D.
Guy went with a poulan 42cc rear handle instead for a little more power in the cut.
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: pete on September 10, 2012, 07:08:49 am
I have 4 of those little xxv 2 deluxe 2 just xxv  Got to get them running think membranes and fuel lines should do it, two will start but its a hard job,   I like my little echo 280 for 1 hand work but it's front fuel tank causes boiling fuel issues
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: North West Farmer on September 10, 2012, 08:39:38 pm
Pete,
The only problems I ever experienced with the XXV's were: 1 Membranes, 2 fuel lines, 3 fuel filter, 4 air filter, 5 chain oil reservoir (sponge used for distribution of oil to the chain oiler. The sponge used as a device to control the flow of chain oil was pretty mickey mouse, but after you figured out what it was for and located material that released oil at about the same rate, it was an easy fix.)
After hours and hours of use, the remains of two XXV's, nothing ever stopped them other than the items mentioned above.
I don't believe anybody ever thought a cheapy little saw like that would or could ever produce like they did over many years.  For the non mechanically inclined, many ended up in the dumper and somebody like me picked it up and used it for a lifetime of pruning and cutting firewood.

Nick, North West Farmer
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: Cut4fun . on December 07, 2013, 03:28:57 pm
What a difference the L setting was for winter weather compared to the spring-summer setting.

 Put a little better drum on it and 12" set up to help a guy that his O 241 is puking bar oil through the muffler.   Told him I had plenty of trim saws if he needed one. He stated nah. Later he  ask how much.  I said look at this way, you dropped off the locked up 040. Your O 241 is puking bar oil out muffler and you want a trim saw.  I'll give you the 1800 PHO.  Then noticed his bar would work. So I grabbed a bar I had, then his chain was a 52dl and my bar was 45dl. So I donated a chain too.   

Then the dag nab thing wouldnt run for chit while he was here.  So today dumped the fuel and retuned carb.  All good now.   

Dang just noticed not this year when it came back, but 2012.  :o

So ready for pick up now  and Merry Christmas.......................
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: doreadeal on December 09, 2013, 09:26:57 am
On my craftsmen 2.0 I have to run it way rich on the L. To the point it won't run long just sitting before it loads up and stalls. About 20 seconds in fact. Its still not great to start though, maybe three pulls with choke, then one or two with it off. I've never found a sweet spot for this saw. I ported the muffler a while ago and it actually ran/started better, still not perfect though. I really don't like using it for anything other then branches and small stuff though. It has more then enough to pull the 16" bar, but constantly packs the filter with chips. Also gets it bad in the bar oiler area, to the extent it will stop the oil if not cleaned. It seems to take no time at all for this to happen.
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: Eccentric on December 09, 2013, 04:09:40 pm
On my craftsmen 2.0 I have to run it way rich on the L. To the point it won't run long just sitting before it loads up and stalls. About 20 seconds in fact. Its still not great to start though, maybe three pulls with choke, then one or two with it off. I've never found a sweet spot for this saw. I ported the muffler a while ago and it actually ran/started better, still not perfect though. I really don't like using it for anything other then branches and small stuff though. It has more then enough to pull the 16" bar, but constantly packs the filter with chips. Also gets it bad in the bar oiler area, to the extent it will stop the oil if not cleaned. It seems to take no time at all for this to happen.

These saws have a very long fuel line.  If the carb diaphragms aren't fresh and/or the impulse signal is weak, they won't pump/pull fuel for ****.  I'm thinking your carb could use a rebuild, and the crank seals are probably leaking.  Common on these saws.  When the seals leak, the impulse signal is weak.  You shouldn't have to run the L side that far out.  I've had Micros with bad crank seals act that way (even with fresh fuel lines and carb diaphragms).  Changing the seals cured 'em.

You can get the seals from your local Husqvarna dealer.  530019059 is both a Poulan and Husky part # now, as Husqvarna sold some rebadged Poulan Micros a while back (Husqvarna 23, etc).  SKF4913 is the # for a 'generic' seal that you can get at your local bearing place.  Probably won't be any cheaper than what you'd get at the Husky dealer however. 

Even when everything's 'right' on these saws, they can still take several pulls to get to the first 'pop' after sitting a while.  That's just par for the course when you have about 14 feet of fuel line (OK maybe it's not quite that long.....but you get the idea).:D
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: doreadeal on December 09, 2013, 05:54:58 pm
Good info on the seals. I've done the carb and fuel lines, something I do on every saw with any time on it. Wouldn't surprise me if the seals are leaking at all.
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: Eccentric on December 09, 2013, 06:15:15 pm
They're easy to change on these saws.
Title: Re: Poulan 1800
Post by: bustedknuckles on December 23, 2013, 06:06:19 pm
Just sold a very nice condition 2000 yesterday. When I got it, it would run with mix in the carb. Emptied out the fuel tank and found a duckbill valve, a loose filter and about 6 pieces of fuel line. When I tried to pick up the line it would turn to paste in my fingers. New lines, clean and inspect the carb and a bit of tuning and it was ready to go. The chain was terrible. I brought it to MI to cut down a crab apple tree for my sister. Got that cut up and sold the saw on Grand Rapids CL as I don't really have room in the car and don't need it anyway. So for $45 someone got a nice saw.