Chainsaw Repair

Chain - Grinders - Filing - Wood Milling - Tools - Welding - Machinist - Mowers - Tillers => Chain - Bars - Grinders - Filing => Topic started by: Cut4fun . on July 27, 2011, 04:19:32 pm

Title: How to identify Oregon chain + Maintenance
Post by: Cut4fun . on July 27, 2011, 04:19:32 pm
To help the guys that have trouble with oregon chain v/s stihl chain.

http://www.oregonchain.com/pdf/maint_safety_manual/manual_maint_03.pdf


saw chain, guide bar, drive sprockets, maintenance and safety manuals.

http://www.oregonchain.com/maintenance/manual.htm


Chainsaw rim sprockets and wear manual.

http://www.oregonproducts.com/pro/pdf/maintenance_manual/ms_09.pdf

Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain
Post by: Cut4fun . on July 18, 2013, 02:17:56 pm
Explained

Oregon Chain Saw Chains
Choosing the proper cutter style is critical for maximum production and safety. Below we have listed some of the popular Oregon® chain cutter choices. Remember to use this for  informational purposes.

• Chisel - Also referred to as “Flat Top” or “Square Corner”. Best when used in clean cutting conditions and is a fast cutting chain. This chain will dull quicker if the cutting corner is exposed to dirt or abrasive conditions and takes a little more effort to sharpen properly.

• Semi-Chisel - Also referred to as “Round Tooth” and “Barrel Tooth”. This chain may be a little more forgiving in dirty situations. Many find it easier to file due it’s rounded edge.

• Chipper - This chain is only available in 3/4” pitch Harvester applications. The tooth is easy to spot with its fully rounded corners. Not for use in hand-held applications.

• Micro-Chisel - A fairly new design cutter style that offers small radius working corners for a combination of fast cutting and easy maintenance.  Available in the following hand held applications: .325 pitch (20, 21, 22, 95 series), 1/4” pitch (25 series), .404 pitch (26, 27 series) and .404 pitch Harvester in both (16H and 18X).

• Chamfer Chisel - These cutters have an angular shape with twin cutting corners, this allows outstanding performance and easy maintenance.

• Ripping - Used when cutting parallel to the grain. This style has a special factory grind on the cutters designed for making dimensional limber.
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain
Post by: Philbert on November 14, 2013, 08:50:15 pm
This explains the numbering system for STIHL chains:

https://www.stihldealer.net/Company/WebContent/Content/FileLibrary/SawChainSelection-6.pdf

Philbert
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain
Post by: Philbert on November 14, 2013, 10:55:50 pm
This took me a while to track down: interpretation of Oregon retail chain coding system (e.g. 'S56' = 56 drive links of 3/8 low profile chain, .050 gauge).

Note these codes refers to size only.  It is usually reduced kickback chain, and might be different models of that size (e.g. 91VG or 91P, or  . . . ).

http://www.oregonproducts.com/homeowner/products/chain/consumer_sawchain_loops.htm

It's good to note in case you need to run into a hardware store or home center to replace a chain, and want to know what fits your saw. It's not always marked on the package.
Usually limited to popular chain types and sizes, but for example, I know that I have several saws that use 'S56'.

Philbert
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain
Post by: 660magnum on November 14, 2013, 11:10:36 pm
For the kinds of chains I use . . . They don't have them at the hardware store, TSC, or Home Depot! Not even when I was using a 3214 Mac - for all they have is safety chain.

And instead of saying 3/8 low profile .050" 56DL, it has a code number like S56 and you have to look at the chain carefully to see what it actually is?
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain
Post by: Philbert on November 15, 2013, 12:03:45 am
Some stores, like Home Depot and Lowes tend to only stock chains that fit some of the saws they currently sell.  Some better home centers, hardware stores, and farm stores carry a larger selection, which brings more people in, which lets them carry a larger selection, etc.  But they still are going to stick to mainstream types and common sizes.  Never going to stock much in the way of specialty chains, even the ones who are also STIHL or Husky dealers.

The letter codes are simple, and for people who are less picky about their chains - they just want something that fits.  I have made the analogy several times with tires. Each part of 'P185/65R14' means something, and that is before we get to tread wear and handling ratings.  Most people bring in their car and say ' I need new ones'.  When I see guys with blank stares and a used chain in their hands standing motionless in the OPE aisles I try to help.

Or they say, "I need a new chain, . . . for my Sears saw,  . . . 16 inch blade".  They are happy to pick a 'S56' chain, which is easy to remember. (Sometimes they are happy to give me their old S56 chain, which, since I know it fits several of my saws, means I have plenty of 'stumper' chains .  .  .  ).

Philbert

Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain
Post by: 660magnum on November 15, 2013, 12:15:05 am
I had a far away friend with a Poulan just like his Sears. Some one gave it to him because the chain jumps off. Over the phone, it was difficult to ferret out of him what the chain and bar was on his saws.

Inside you know that one or the other is wrong but you don't know about his sprocket on the saw?

I didn't get too far with him other than identifying exactly each chain and bar that was on his saws. He was mechanically inclined.

He didn't do well at the hardware store. I sent him to Bailey's on the Internet. He seemed happy there and got the Poulan going with a new bar and chain for his model Poulan and enjoys it.
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain
Post by: Philbert on December 02, 2013, 09:16:13 pm
Here's another example:  I am trying a new, cordless pole saw.  It uses Oregon 90SG chain (3/8 low profile, narrow kerf, .043 gauge chain, 34 drive links for the 8 inch guide bar).  This is sold as 'R' chain in hardware stores and home centers. 

The local Menards stocks R56 chain at a fairly cheap price (especially when on sale).  So, as long as I have the right pre-sets, I know that I can get chain locally, if needed, and spin up the right sized loops (actually, buy 2, get 3 in this example!).

Philbert
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain + Maintenance
Post by: Cut4fun . on March 14, 2014, 02:42:48 pm
Was looking for something and came across this 78  page  Oregon Maintenance Manual

 http://www.chainsawchains.eu/Maintenance-Manual.pdf
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain + Maintenance
Post by: Cut4fun . on December 05, 2014, 01:20:50 pm
19 pages of good info from Oregon  http://www.scotsco.com/pdf/Forestry%20Products.pdf
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain + Maintenance
Post by: Cut4fun . on March 08, 2015, 12:18:50 pm
Cant remember if already here or not. But I just had to use this. http://www.oregonproducts.com/homeowner/appguidemoreinfo_consumer.htm
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain + Maintenance
Post by: countryhog on July 08, 2015, 09:43:01 am
good stuff. thanks
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain + Maintenance
Post by: DaveJ on November 27, 2015, 12:10:58 pm
I am s l o w l y learning thanks to all your good info and links!
Title: Re: How to identify Oregon chain + Maintenance
Post by: SawTroll on March 15, 2016, 02:16:32 pm
For the kinds of chains I use . . . They don't have them at the hardware store, TSC, or Home Depot! Not even when I was using a 3214 Mac - for all they have is safety chain.

And instead of saying 3/8 low profile .050" 56DL, it has a code number like S56 and you have to look at the chain carefully to see what it actually is?

I find that additional "consumer code system" rather silly, as you need a decode list to know what chain really is in the package (or to inspect it carefully).

Two different designations on the same chain loops just can't be a good idea.