Author Topic: Oregon 40V Pole Saw  (Read 1266 times)

0 Members and 0 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Philbert

  • Piped Saw
  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Karma: 62
Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« on: February 03, 2014, 01:29:38 pm »
I had the opportunity to try a Beta version of a new Oregon, battery-powered pole saw while doing some tornado clean up work. This saw, which will  be  released this Spring, is part of the Oregon 'PowerNow' cordless OPE product line. It uses the same batteries, chargers, etc. as their other products.

https://oregoncordless.com/US/Products/Tools/Cordless-Pole-Saw

The assembled saw telescopes from 86 to 123 inches, including the 8 inch bar. It comes with Oregon 90SG chain (http://www.oregonproducts.com/pro/pr...chain/90SG.htm) which is 3/8 low-profile AND narrow kerf, .043 pitch, with the bumper drive links. Smaller chains seem well suited for the battery saws. This is NOT the PowerSharp chain, but conventionally filed/sharpened. This chain takes a slightly smaller bite than the 3/8 low-profile, .050 gauge PowerSharp chain used on the Oregon 40 V hand-held chain saw.

The saw motor is located in-line, just after the trigger handle, and uses a splined, aluminum shaft to deliver power to the cutting chain; not a flexible 'speedometer' type cable. The telescoping shaft is oval, and looks like it is some type of fiberglass or graphite composite material.

The guide bar attaches to a cast, aluminum head with a built in brush hook for pulling cut branches loose. The bar is held in place with a tool-less knob on the cover, and chain tension is adjusted by a screw at the end (not from the side). The drive sprocket is held in place with an 'E' clip. The saw uses an automatic oiler (non-adjustable on the model used).


Philbert

Social Buttons


Offline Philbert

  • Piped Saw
  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Karma: 62
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2014, 01:30:58 pm »
The saw can be used with their 1.2, 2.4, or 4.0 Amp-hour, Li-Ion batteries, which all weigh about the same. The 4.0 Ahr batteries have not been released yet, so I was unable to try those.

My first impressions were very positive. it is relatively light, well balanced, and feels well made. It felt lighter in use than the 13.5 pounds (with battery pack) than the specifications indicate, especially when working with the shaft fully retracted. The oval shaft makes it easy to control the rotation of the guide bar and chain.

Use is pretty intuitive, with an tapered/shaped handle and two-part trigger. Everyone I showed it to seemed to understand how to use it right away. Being a battery-powered tool, there is no priming, choke, flooding, etc. It is also quiet, especially between cuts.

The day I used this saw was pretty cold for a battery powered tool, ranging from 10 to 22*F. I actually kept the batteries in a 'cooler' in my car to keep them warm! I used winter grade bar oil, and ran 3 of the 2.4 Ahr batteries, mostly limbing a 24 inch trunk diameter spruce that had its upper half broken off by the storm, and was pleasantly surprised by the battery life.

This pre-release version had a bar oil tank that fills from the end, which is pretty awkward on a 7 foot pole saw, unless you are standing on a deck. The Oregon rep told me that the final version will have a tank with a cap on the side, so it can be filled with the saw laying down. I much prefer a side operated chain tensioner, but this was not too much of a problem with the short chain (34DL loop, which should not stretch much).

I was a little concerned about the knurled, shaft extension collar/locking nut, which is fairly large (about 2-1/2 inches in diameter) - I have small hands, and have had problems with this part on manual pole pruners 'locking up', meaning that I had to use some type of strap wrench to loosen them. I did not have any problems with this one, but only used it for a limited period.

I showed the saw to a number of other responders, and the only negative comment I received was from a guy in the tree business who commented that the chain speed is slower than his gas powered saw, and he did not think that he would like that.

Philbert

Offline Philbert

  • Piped Saw
  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Karma: 62
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2014, 01:33:18 pm »
The saw cut very well with the sharp chain and the weight of the cutting head doing all of the work. Granted, the green spruce I tried it on is not the most challenging wood, but in storm clean up I like each cut to be deliberate, and to watch to see if anything moves or changes. The lack of a cord, eliminating the need to start and stop a gas powered saw, and the minimum amount of noise when cutting, were all positives.

Having multiple battery packs is pretty important for extended use. I brought an inverter to charge these in my car, but did not need it or use it with 3 battery packs. The 4 Ahr batteries, due this Spring, would be very beneficial.

Photos show pole saw in use on the standing part of a tree, and a pile of limbs cut with the first battery charge (note pole saw on pile for size reference).

Philbert

Offline Cut4fun .

  • Administrator
  • Nitro Hotsaw
  • *******
  • Posts: 18290
  • Karma: 346
  • OHIO REDNECK Saw Repair Getter Done
    • Redneck Chainsaw Repair
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2014, 01:35:06 pm »
Nice read.   

Any idea how many feet and inches it is when fulling extended out?

Weight of it when ready for use?

Any speculation on what this will cost?

Thanks for posting.


I guess we could get powernow member to answer us if you dont happen know. 
REDNECK Saw Repair Getter Done

Offline Philbert

  • Piped Saw
  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Karma: 62
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2014, 01:48:28 pm »
The assembled saw telescopes from 86 to 123 inches, including the 8 inch bar.

Weight is 13.5 pounds (with battery pack) according to specifications, and pretty close on my scale.  There might be a pound or 2 difference between battery packs, and with the new bar oil tank.

I don't know what the pricing will be.  That will vary with which battery and charger is included, or if it is sold as a 'bare' tool for someone who already owns the chainsaw, hedge trimmer, or string trimmer (same batteries and chargers).

As a side note, not having a gasoline motor running removes a lot of distraction, making this tool very easy to use, and very easy to communicate with co-workers - nice when working overhead.  On/Off simplicity.  I have an electric pole saw (Remington) with these advantages, but it does not feel as well made, or as well balanced, and of course, the cord can be an issue some times. 

As noted, the chain does not spin as fast as a gas powered pole saw, which could be an issue for production work.  But I think that pole saw work tends to be slower and more deliberate than production felling or firewood production.

Nice tool for a homeowner.  Could be a good choice for a landscaper, groundskeeper, or arborist.

I think I actually like this tool more than the battery chainsaw.

Philbert

Offline Cut4fun

  • Administrator
  • Nitro Hotsaw
  • *******
  • Posts: 3731
  • Karma: 133
  • OHIO REDNECK
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2014, 02:52:07 pm »
Just trying to get a idea of the weight and inches above to what I am already using.

PPT 261 12' 10" Dry Weight (lb)* 16.7lb no bar and chain.    154"    not including the 12" bar  so 166" total.  13' 10"
plus 4' or 5' extension can be bought extra.

That oregon one sounds nice at 13.5lbs 123"  10'  3"
REDNECK Saw Repair

Offline Philbert

  • Piped Saw
  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Karma: 62
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2014, 03:35:44 pm »
Does that pole saw telescope, or have fixed segments?

The collapsed length is also important for transport and storage. I was able to just fit this one in my small station wagon. I cannot get the telescoping STIHL pole saws into that car, but can fit the sectional (gas) ones.

Philbert

Offline Cut4fun .

  • Administrator
  • Nitro Hotsaw
  • *******
  • Posts: 18290
  • Karma: 346
  • OHIO REDNECK Saw Repair Getter Done
    • Redneck Chainsaw Repair
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2014, 04:13:50 pm »
Telescope

I'll dig up a pic.
REDNECK Saw Repair Getter Done

Offline Cut4fun .

  • Administrator
  • Nitro Hotsaw
  • *******
  • Posts: 18290
  • Karma: 346
  • OHIO REDNECK Saw Repair Getter Done
    • Redneck Chainsaw Repair
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2014, 04:20:35 pm »
echo ppt261

Apart for shipping and pic of when I unpacked it.



Before shipping to me




Cant find my pic put together in barn. 1 from online shown it collapsed.





REDNECK Saw Repair Getter Done

Offline Philbert

  • Piped Saw
  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Karma: 62
Re: Oregon 40V Pole Saw
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2014, 04:30:39 pm »
All things equal, a telescoping pole saw lets you adjust to a desired length, which sometimes makes it easier to work between other branches.  It also means that you don't have to carry extra pieces, or stop to assemble/disassemble them.

Sectional pole saws sometimes allow you to use an extension for extra length, and as noted above, may break down into smaller pieces for transport/storage.

Sounds like you got some advantages of each: telescoping with an optional extention!

Here are the manufacturer specs for the Echo PPT 266 (newer model?): http://www.echo-usa.com/Products/Power-Pruners/PPT-266

Another point to mention on the Oregon pole saw is that the trigger is very easy to operate even while wearing thick gloves, even with the trigger safety device  (visible in second pair of photos, above).

Philbert

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
20 Replies
6579 Views
Last post August 05, 2015, 05:12:03 pm
by Cut4fun .
5 Replies
271 Views
Last post September 18, 2013, 07:11:29 pm
by Cut4fun .
11 Replies
110 Views
Last post October 02, 2014, 01:31:26 pm
by 660magnum
2 Replies
101 Views
Last post February 16, 2015, 02:53:59 pm
by Eccentric
19 Replies
172 Views
Last post March 22, 2015, 07:54:43 pm
by jmester
8 Replies
309 Views
Last post April 06, 2015, 06:56:20 pm
by Nathaniel Vansickle
22 Replies
553 Views
Last post January 03, 2016, 01:40:07 pm
by Chris-PA
21 Replies
424 Views
Last post November 04, 2015, 09:30:28 pm
by wild262
2 Replies
185 Views
Last post December 07, 2015, 06:45:24 pm
by Cut4fun .
2 Replies
72 Views
Last post May 20, 2017, 05:49:10 pm
by Cut4fun .